CARDIOVASCULAR
hamburger

The New York Heart Association (NYHA) classifies the stages of heart failure as follows:2

No limitation of physical activity. Ordinary physical activity does not cause undue fatigue, palpitation, dyspnea (shortness of breath).

Class 1 with silhouette of man running

Slight limitation of physical activity. Comfortable at rest. Ordinary physical activity results in fatigue, palpitation, dyspnea (shortness of breath).

Class 2 with silhouette of man walking.

Marked limitation of physical activity. Comfortable at rest. Less than ordinary activity causes fatigue, palpitation or dyspnea.

Class 3 with silhouette of weak man walking slowly.

Unable to carry on any physical activity without discomfort. Symptoms of heart failure at rest. If any physical activity is undertaken, discomfort increases.

Class IV with silhouette of man sitting in chair.

The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association categorize the development and progression of heart failure into 4 stages: A through D.1,3

Stage A

Patients at high risk of developing heart failure who are asymptomatic and have no identified structural or functional cardiac abnormalities.

Stage B

Patients with structural heart disease associated with the development of heart failure but who are asymptomatic.

Stage C

Patients who have current or prior symptoms of heart failure associated with underlying structural disease.

Stage D

Patients with advanced structural heart disease and marked symptoms of heart failure at rest despite optimal medical management and who require specialized interventions.

Common symptoms of the advanced heart failure patient4

  • Dyspnea
  • Right ventricular failure
  • Fatigue
  • Edema
  • Abdominal distention
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Intolerance to previously tolerated doses of ACE inhibitors and beta blockers
  • Escalating diuretics with persistent congestion

When your evaluation confirms disease progression to advanced heart failure, act early.

Refer your patients to an advanced heart failure center for evaluation for advanced therapies

  • Manuals & Resources
  • Find a HeartMate 3 LVAD Center
  • Customer Service

References

  1. Jessup M, Brozena S. Heart failure. N Engl J Med. 2003;348:2007-2018.
  2. https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/heartfailure/what-is-heartfailure/classes-of-heartfailure. Accessed on Dec. 10, 2020.
  3. Hunt SA, Baker DW, Chin MH, et al. ACC/AHA Guidelines for the Evaluation and Management of Chronic Heart Failure in the Adult: Executive Summary. A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines (Committee to Revise the 1995 Guidelines for the Evaluation and Management of Heart Failure). Circulation. 2001;104:2996-3007.
  4. AbouEzzeddine OF, Redfield MM. Who has advanced heart failure? Definition and epidemiology. Congest Heart Fail. 2011;17:1-18.
Indications, Safety & Warnings

MAT-2012371 v1.0

DO YOU WISH TO CONTINUE AND EXIT CARDIOVASCULAR.ABBOTT?

CONTENTS OF THE SITE ARE NOT UNDER THE CONTROL OF ABBOTT.

False
accessibility
© 2019 Abbott. All Rights Reserved. Please read the Legal Notice for further details.

Unless otherwise specified, all product and service names appearing in this Internet site are trademarks owned by or licensed to Abbott, its subsidiaries or affiliates. No use of any Abbott trademark, trade name, or trade dress in this site may be made without the prior written authorization of Abbott, except to identify the product or services of the company.

accessibility

DO YOU WISH TO CONTINUE AND EXIT CARDIOVASCULAR.ABBOTT?

CONTENTS OF THE SITE ARE NOT UNDER THE CONTROL OF ABBOTT.