CARDIOVASCULAR
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TMVr is a minimally invasive technique for treatment of significant, symptomatic mitral regurgitation (MR). It is performed using venous access and real-time imaging, thereby avoiding cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients generally recover within the post-procedure hospitalization and demonstrate improved functional capacity and quality of life.1

This treatment increases the options for patients who are at prohibitive risk for surgical intervention.

Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair (TMVr) with MitraClip Therapy

THE BURDEN OF MITRAL REGURGITATION

MR is a condition in which the heart's mitral valve leaflets do not close tightly. When this happens, blood flows backward from the heart's left ventricle into the left atrium. The heart must then work harder to push blood through the body, which can cause fatigue, shortness of breath, and worsening heart failure.2

MR is the most frequent valve disease in the United States.3,4 Over 4 million people have significant MR, with an annual incidence of 250,000.3-5 Prevalence and incidence are similar in Europe, where it's the second most common type of heart valve disease.6  The disease affects millions of people worldwide.

ESC/EACTS TREATMENT GUIDELINES

For symptomatic patients diagnosed with moderate-severe or severe MR, surgery is generally recommended to repair or replace the mitral valve. This typically involves open-heart surgery with the patient on cardiopulmonary bypass.1,6

According to the 2017 ESC/EACTS Guidelines for the Management of Valvular Heart Disease, transcatheter mitral valve repair (TMVr) with MitraClip therapy may be considered for patients with severe MR who are not suitable for surgery.6

MITRACLIP THERAPY

The world's first transcatheter mitral valve repair (TMVr) system delivers a therapeutic option for select high-surgical-risk patients with degenerative MR who would otherwise go untreated.7

References

1. Sorajja P, et al. Initial experience with commercial transcatheter mitral valve repair in the United States. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2016;67(10):1129-1140.
2. MedLine Plus Medical Encyclopedia. Mitral valve regurgitation. Accessed July 24, 2018.
3. Benjamin EJ, et al. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2018 Update. A Report From the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2018;137:e67–e492. DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000558
4. Nkomo VT, et al. Burden of valvular heart diseases: a population-based study. Lancet. 2006;368(9540):1005-1011.
5. US Census Bureau. 2012-2016 American Community Survey Census Bureau 5-Year Estimates.
6. The Joint Task Force on the Management of Valvular Heart Disease of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS). 2017 Guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease. Eur Heart J.2017;38(21):2739-2791.
7. MitraClip NTR XTR Clip Delivery System Instructions for Use.

AP2946593-WBO Rev. A

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