CARDIOVASCULAR
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SURVEY METHODOLOGY

What methodology was used?

A national consumer survey was conducted to learn more about the public’s attitudes and perceptions toward heart failure. The survey included a sample of 3,000 U.S. residents ages 18+.1

Results were weighted a priori (through survey sampling) and ad hoc (applied weights), to be representative of nationwide census on age and gender, with additional monitoring to ensure representation across ethnicity, income, etc.

These results represent a statistical accuracy of ±1.8%. All analysis was performed at a 95% confidence level.

Abbott was not revealed as the study’s sponsor.


When was the survey conducted?

The survey was conducted between March 11 and March 22, 2019.


KEY FINDINGS

Despite minority groups recognizing that they are at a higher risk of developing heart failure, they are not any more likely to correctly identify symptoms or know what to do if they were experiencing heart failure.

  • African Americans and Hispanics are disproportionately affected by the disease:
    • African Americans account for only 13% of the total population yet represent 21% of those living with heart failure.
    • Hispanics are 18% of the total population yet represent 22% of those living with heart failure.
    • Compared to other ethnicities, African Americans are twice as likely to be affected by heart failure. Hispanics are 1.5 times as likely.
  • And according to the survey results, those same groups were more likely to correctly identify their racial demographic as being at risk for heart failure.
  • However, Hispanic and African American respondents are not any more likely to correctly recognize symptoms or know what to do if they thought they were experiencing heart failure.
    • 43% of Hispanic respondents said they would not be able to quickly recognize if they were experiencing heart failure.
    • 48% of African American respondents said they would not be able to quickly recognize if they were experiencing heart failure.
    • By comparison, 49% of Caucasian respondents said they would not be able to quickly recognize if they were experiencing heart failure.

This finding is in line with the broader trend that people are generally aware of heart failure, but don’t have enough information to take action.

  • Most people don’t think heart failure will impact them or their family; however, every 2 in 5 Americans are either affected by heart failure or personally know someone who is affected by it.
  • Most people perceive heart failure as a very serious disease, but there is a disassociation between “heart failure” and softer diagnoses like “weak heart.”

Those who report being very concerned about their personal risk for heart failure represent potentially vulnerable populations.

  • They are significantly more likely to be less educated, lower income and/or supporting a family.
  • But the concern is not driving patients to seek care. Among those who say they are very concerned, a full third of people are unlikely to speak to their doctor about it.

Respondents said they desire information about heart failure but are unlikely to talk about it with the number one source for health information – their doctor.

  • Most respondents (65%) wish they knew more about heart failure, but only 1 in 5 are likely to speak to their health care provider about it.
  • People rely on their health care providers to bring up heart failure as a concern, however nearly half of respondents (45%) mistakenly believe that only a cardiologist can diagnose heart failure.

People understand heart failure can be controlled, but they aren’t confident in identifying symptoms.

  • 56% of respondents believe that heart failure can be controlled if identified early, but only 1 in 5 said they would quickly recognize whether they were experiencing heart failure. That mirrors the findings that only 20% of respondents could correctly identify the majority of heart failure symptoms.
  • Only 1 in 3 people would know what to do if they suspected they were experiencing heart failure.

Awareness and relevancy is key to spurring action.

  • In the next 12 months, 29% of respondents are very likely to try to learn more about heart health, and 35% of respondents are very likely to take actions to improve heart health. Those people are generally already more concerned about their potential risk and almost half are personally affected by heart failure or know someone who is.
  • In the same time period of 12 months, 48% of respondents are generally unlikely to try to learn about heart health and 40% of respondents are generally unlikely to take actions to improve heart health. Those people tend to be younger and primarily white. They perceive heart failure as mostly being a risk for older individuals. They are aware of heart failure but don’t know anything about it.

SURVEY DEMOGRAPHICS

What were the survey demographics?


GENDER COUNT %
Female 1552 52%
Male 1432 48%
Non-Binary 16 0%
Total 3000 100%

AGE COUNT %
18-24 283 14%
25-34 460 17%
35-44 460 17%
45-54 489 20%
55-64 505 16%
65+ 481 17%
Total 2678 100%

ETHNICITY COUNT %
Not of Hispanic, Latino or Spanish origin 2274 85%
Mexican/Mexican American/Chicano 196 7%
Puerto Rican 75 3%
Cuban 26 1%
Another Hispanic, Latino or Spanish origin 107 4%
Prefer not to state 0 0%
Total 2678 100%

RACE* COUNT %
White 2093 78%
Black/African American 348 13%
American Indian or Alaska Native 74 3%
Asian Indian 32 1%
Japanese 32 1%
Native Hawaiian 2 0%
Chinese 21 1%
Korean 15 1%
Guamanian or Chamorro 3 0%
Filipino 28 1%
Vietnamese 7 0%
Samoan 3 0%
Other Asian 14 1%
Other Pacific Islander 2 0%
Some other race 108 4%
Total 2678 100%

*Note: This was a multiple response question.


INCOME COUNT %
Less than $25,000 679 25%
$25,000 to $49,999 759 28%
$50,000 to $74,999 522 19%
$75,000 to $99,999 333 13%
$100,000 to $124,999 173 7%
$125,000 or greater 212 8%
Prefer not to state 0 0%
Total 2678 100%

EDUCATION COUNT %
High school diploma/GED 659 25%
Some college, no degree 639 24%
2-year/associate’s or vocational degree 395 15%
4-year/bachelor’s degree 624 23%
Graduate/master’s degree 219 8%
Advanced/professional degree (PhD, MD, etc) 116 4%
Prefer not to state 26 1%
Total 2678 100%
REFERENCES

1. Full survey data on file at Abbott.

SJM-CV WEB-0519-0187(1)

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